General guidelines on how to lose weight(2)

Limitation of fats in the diet

Operationalization

TDCR vs. TDCI

In the previous article [Powertec (136)], it was mentioned that your basis of subtracting the 500 calories should be from thetotal daily caloric intake(TDCI); however, in most instances, the computation of TDCI is so demanding and difficult for people, like you, who are on the go to keep up with the demands of daily living. In fact, you might need the help of a nutritionist-dietitian to compute for it.Thus, instead of TDCI, it is thetotal daily caloric requirement(TDCR)which is used.

Assuming that you opted to lose 1 pound per week, then you need to reduce your TDCR by 500 calories per day or 3,500 calories per week. Since you are moderately active, your TDCR should be 157 pounds x 15 giving a product of 2,355 calories; and since you are 38 years old, you need to subtract 100 from 2,355 giving a difference of 2,255[1]. If you have normal weight, the total number of calories that you need to take per day in order to maintain your normal weight is 2,255 calories; this is your TDCR; but since you are overweight, you need to reduce your TDCR by 500 calories per day [consult Powertec (136)for all the necessary tables].

Limitation of fat intake

To fast track your weight reduction, you limit your fat intake to 10% of the TDCR; hence, 10% of 2,255 is 225.5 or 226 calories which is equivalent to 25 grams of fat per day, derived from dividing 226 by 9. You need to take only 25 grams of fat per day which means limiting your fat intake to 10% of the TDCR. This is the smallest amount of fatintake allowable to you; if you take less than 10%, you will suffer from some vitamin deficiencies, especially linked to the fat-soluble vitamins [1].

If you used to take 80 grams of fat per day, but now you are taking only 25 grams per day, then you are reducing your food intake by 495 calories per day derived from multiplying 55 (the difference of 80 – 25) grams of fatby 9 calories. If you multiply 495 by 7 days, then you are losing approximately 3,500 calories per week which could reduce your weight by 1 pound per week. This means that even if you will not reduce your protein and carbohydrate intake, the reduction in fat intake is enough to effect reduction in your weight.

In the preceding example, you limited your fat intake to 10%. If you want to use 20% or 30%, then it is also acceptable; however, you now need to reduce also your protein and carbohydrate intake, enough to give a total of 500 calories of daily reduction in your TDCR.

When you have reached your ideal weight, you now shiftto consumingyour total TDCR which is 2,255 calories. You need to take foods whose total caloric contribution will be 2,255. You do not need to reduce it; otherwise, you become underweight.

Ways of reducing fat intake

  1. Avoid deep-fried and fried foods;
  2. Take fatty meats, lard, butter, cheese, cream, whole milk, egg yolk, vegetable oils, nuts, chocolates, avocados, olives, and margarine [1] in moderate amounts;
  3. When buying packed foods, read the “Nutrition Facts” and find out the saturated fat It should contain less than 10% of saturated fat; and
  4. When buying packed foods, select those not containing trans-fatty acid and hydrogenated fats.

Reference:

  1. Roth, Ruth A. Nutrition and Diet Therapy. Singapore: Delmar Learning, 2007.

General guidelines on how to lose weight(1)

Limitation of fats in the diet

One of the ways of facilitating your weight reduction is to focus on the limitation of fat intake. This is very effective because one gram of fats could give you 9 calories of energy whereas protein and carbohydrates could only give you 4 calories per gram. Thus, if you limit your intake of fats, your losing calories—and subsequently your weight—would be faster than when you solely restrict your protein or carbohydrate intake.

Steps

Determine how many calories you need to maintain your ideal weight. You can look at your ideal body weight in the ensuing Table 1[1]USDA Acceptance Weights for Adults

*The higher weights in the ranges generally apply to men, who tend to have more muscle and bone than women; the lower weights more often apply to women [1].

To find your calorie needs, multiply your ideal weight by 15 if you are moderately active or by 20 if you are very active[1].

From that total, subtract the following according to your age:

                              Age 25-34, subtract 0

                             Age 35-44, subtract 100

                             Age 45-54, subtract 200

                             Age 55-64, subtract 300

                              Age 65+, subtract 400[1]

To find your fat-gram allowance, multiply your daily calories by the percentage of fat desired (10%, 20%, or 30%); then divide by 9 calories/g[1].

Operationalization

Suppose you are male, 38 years old, with height of 5’ 4”,  with present weight of 170 pounds, and moderately active. Firstly, you want to find out if you are overweight, underweight, or with normal weight. So you look at Table 1, and you find out that the maximum weight that you should have is 157 pounds. Offhand, you are overweight by 13 pounds. Therefore, the program that you will need is weight reduction.

Ideally, you need to lose 1-2 pounds per week; thus, if you prefer to lose 1 pound per week, then you will need 13 weeks or approximately three months to normalize your weight. If you want to accelerate your weight reduction, you can target to lose 2 pounds per week, and you need around 6-7 weeks or 1 ½ months.

Before proceeding with the discussion, you need to understand two technical terms: (1) total daily caloric intake (TDCI), and total daily caloric requirement (TDCR). TDCI refers to the actual number of calories that you take each day, while TDCR refers to the number of calories that you should take each day to maintain your ideal weight [Please consult Powertec (20)].

Since you are overweight, it is safe to assume that your TDCI has been very much higher than your TDCR. You have been taking more calories than what you need, or more than what you can burn. Thus, the excess calories are stored and deposited in your body making you heavier than your ideal weight. Therefore, in your weight reduction, the basis of subtracting the number of calories that you need to slice off each day should be from the TDCI.

 

Reference:

  1. Roth, Ruth A. Nutrition and Diet Therapy. Singapore: Delmar Learning, 2007.